/customers/academia.dk/academia.dk/httpd.www/Blog/wp-content/plugins/wp-cache/wp-cache-phase1.php Burial | Tænketanken

Posts Tagged ‘Burial’

The Graves of a Catholic woman and her Protestant husband, Holland [da]

søndag den 30. juni 2013

Graves of a Catholic woman and her Protestant husband, who were not allowed to be buried together.

Via @Earth_Pics

I wondered where to find these peculiar graves, and what the history behind them were. I now see that dichotomization can add at least some of the story:

In the Protestant part of this cemetery, J.W.C van Gorcum, colonel of the Dutch Cavalry and militia commissioner in Limburg, is buried. His wife, lady J.C.P.H van Aefferden, is buried in the Catholic part. They were married in 1842, the lady was 22 and the colonel was 33, but he was a protestant and didn’t belong to the nobility. This caused quite a commotion in Roermond. After being married for 38 years, the colonel died in 1880 and was buried in the protestant part of the cemetery against the wall. His wife died in 1888 and had decided not to be buried in the family tomb but on the other side of the wall, which was the closest she could get to her husband. Two clasped hands connect the graves across the wall.

Roermond is in Holland, and you can actually find the grave on Google Maps! Plus som extra photos of the grave, incl. pic no. 2 of the grave dressed in snow.

Tibetan Sky Burial [da]

søndag den 30. september 2012

For the most part, Westerners formally dispose of our bodies in one of two ways: as a rule, we bury or we burn.

The Tibetans do things a little differently.

Images via ellamorte:

Sky burial, or ritual dissection, is a funerary practice in Tibet, wherein a human corpse is incised in certain locations and placed on a mountaintop, exposing it to the elements (mahabhuta) and animals – especially predatory birds. The locations of preparation and sky burial are understood in the Vajrayana traditions as charnel grounds. In Tibet the practice is known as jhator (Tibetan: བྱ་གཏོར་, Wylie: bya gtor), which means “giving alms to the birds.”

The majority of Tibetans adhere to Buddhism, which teaches rebirth. There is no need to preserve the body, as it is now an empty vessel. Birds may eat it, or nature may let it decompose. So the function of the sky burial is simply to dispose of the remains. In much of Tibet, the ground is too hard and rocky to dig a grave, and, due to the scarcity of fuel and timber, sky burials are often more practical than cremation. High lamas and some other dignitaries may receive burials so as to honor them in death, but sky burials were standard practice for commoners.

Source: Wikipedia