/customers/academia.dk/academia.dk/httpd.www/Blog/wp-content/plugins/wp-cache/wp-cache-phase1.php Tænketanken | En blog om sundhedsvæsen, medicinhistorie, neurovidenskab og hverdagen i et klinisk biokemisk laboratorium - Part 5

Myrtis: Face to Face with the Past [en]

17. marts 2013

Stage by stage the facial reconstruction of an 11-year-old girl known as ‘Myrtis’ whose skull was unearthed in excellent condition from a mass grave with victims of the Plague that struck Athens of 430 BC.

The original skull was replicated via three-dimensional modeling and rapid prototyping techniques. The reconstruction followed the Manchester method, laying the facial tissues from the surface of the skull outward by using depth-marker pegs as thickness guides. The shape, size, and position of the eyes, ears, nose, and mouth were determined according to features of the underlying skeletal tissues, whereas the hairstyle followed the fashion of the time.

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I love realism! [en]

17. marts 2013

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[da]

17. marts 2013

Chinese man keeps himself alive for 13 years with HOMEMADE dialysis machine

Three times a week, Hu Songwen sits on a small toilet in his home in a rural east China town and fires up his homemade dialysis machine.

Hu, who suffers from kidney disease, made it from kitchen utensils and old medical instruments after he could no long afford hospital fees.

‘The cost for each home treatment is only 60 yuan (£6), which is 12 per cent of the hospital charge for dialysis,’ Hu said.

Via Jay Parkinson

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[da]

17. marts 2013

Colored x-ray of a full-term fetus in breech position

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Open sources for age determination of human skeletal remains [da]

11. marts 2013

This should keep you busy for a while - a bunch of interesting links via theolduvaigorge:

Age estimation from the sternal end of the rib
Age estimation from the sternal end of the rib

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[da]

10. marts 2013

This should keep you busy for a while - a bunch of interesting links via theolduvaigorge:

Open sources for age determination of human skeletal remains:

Age estimation of children from prehistoric Southeast Asia: are the dental formation methods used appropriate?

Variability of the Pattern of Aging on the Human Skeleton: Evidence from Bone Indicators and Implications on Age at Death Estimation

Age Estimation From the Auricular Surface of the Ilium: A Revised Method

Estimation of Age in Adolescents—The Basilar Synchondrosis

Three Dimensional Quantitative Analyses of Human Pubic Symphyseal Morphology: Can Current Limitations of Skeletal Aging Methods Be Resolved

Juvenile ageing methods in the Caribbean archipelago

The Coronal Pulp Cavity Index: A Forensic Tool for Age Determination in Human Adult

Estimating age at death of humans from toothwear

Sex Differences and Aging of the Vertebral Column

Forensic aspects of foetal and neonatal skeletons

Quantitative analyses of human pubic symphyseal morphology using three dimensional data: the potential utility for aging adult human skeletons

A Bayesian Approach to the Estimation of the Age of Humans from Tooth Development and Wear

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[da]

20. februar 2013

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Prosthetic nose used by a a woman with syphilis (19th cent.) [da]

16. februar 2013
Prosthetic nose (19th cent.)
Prosthetic nose (19th cent.)

We don’t know much about her. We don’t even know her name. What we do know is that the woman who wore the above prosthetic lost her nose in the middle of the 19th century due to a raging case of syphilis.

Read more on Lindsey Fitzharris' wonderful blog The Chirurgeon's Apprentice: "Syphilis: A Love Story"

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Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) [da]

16. februar 2013

A 'Spine Lecture' I found on YouTube by Spiro Antoniades, M.D.

I am sure that in the future you will here more of DISH here on the blog!

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a spondyloarthropathy also known as Forestier's disease and ankylosing hyperostosis. It is a noninflammatory disease, with the principal manifestation being calcification and ossification of spinal ligaments and the regions where tendons and ligaments attach to bone (entheses). The whole spine may be involved, and bony ankylosis occurs, although the disc spaces and facet joints remain unaffected. In advanced stages, the disease may look like melted candle wax. The calcification and ossification is most common in the right side of the spine. In people with dextrocardia and situs inversus this calcification occurs on the left side, which confirms the role of the descending thoracic aorta in preventing the physical manifestations of DISH on one side of the spine. (Wikipedia)

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[da]

5. februar 2013

Leicester City Council have already been updating their signs.

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